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Coating the Studio Floor and the ADA Wooden Ramp/Deck With Armorpoxy Products - Part I of II

December 4, 2011 - This blog post will be dedicated to the Armorpoxy Company of Union NJ. The company has been very helpful in working with us to select the right protective coatings for the studio floor and the wooden decks/ramps. Turns out that they had products that were perfect for both applications. Their ArmorTex acrylic latex paint was used on the wood ramp/deck, and their Armorpoxy II concrete coating was used on the studio floor. We worked closely with Dan Blum, President of the company, who was very generous with his time and advice.

The Armorpoxy products were shipped directly from their manufacturing plant in central, NJ to our jobsite in The Woodlands,Texas via common carrier. Armorpoxy features it's "Job on a Pallet" service. They work closely with the contractor or homeowner to insure you have everything needed to prep, apply and install their products on our job. Let's take a closer look at how these products were used on the epic Creative Co-Op.

Armorpoxy II - for the studio floor, we went with this high gloss industrial-grade epoxy product. It does not require mixing, is dry to the touch in 24 hours and fully cures in just a few days. Our concrete studio floor measures 28 feet x 44 feet, and coverage for Armorpoxy II is approximately 300 feet per gallon. Since we had been using the studio as our workshop, we began by emptying it of all the building materials, tools and items we were storing in it. 

With the room empty, we swept the floor, then used a 3200psi power washer to remove any surface dirt and grime. Preparation is key with any coating product, and having a good clean substrate to bond to will allow the Armorpoxy products to provide service for years to come. With the floor still wet, we used Armoretch, a safe etching solution and mixed it with water as directed on the label. Using a stiff brush, gloves and protective eye-ware, we poured it onto the surface and brushed it into the concrete. You could watch the product work as fumes from the acid came off the wet surface. Having worked with muriatic acid, the low level of fumes of the Armoretch were a nice change from what we used in the past.

We used a couple of gallons of the product (each gallon will treat about 600 square feet). We let the Armoretch do its work for the next hour, then came back and power washed it from the floor. Since it was a Friday afternoon, we decided to let the floor dry over the weekend, and our plans are to begin with the epoxy coatings next week (if the weather cooperates with us).

On Saturday, we turned our attention to the wooden ramp and exterior decks. Our decks and ramps are made of 3/4" exterior plywood, and we were told to expect about 6 years of life unless we used an industrial grade wood coating on them. For this job, we turned to ArmorTex exterior latex floor paint. After working with it, we are confident this durable uniform coating will add years to the life of our decks. It also helps by hiding many of the surface imperfections of the plywood. It can also stand up to commercial traffic, and has a non-skid additive that will help make the ramps safer. One 5 gallon pail will cover approximately 500 square feet.

We began by removing all of the aluminum composite panels we installed around the deck and ramps last month. This allowed us to paint the full surface of the plywood. We cut in (hand painted) areas that would not be easy to get to with a roller, and used the Armorpoxy Adjustable 18" Roller Frame and Roller Covers for the larger areas. The rigid tubular steel frame and fiberglass-reinforced nylon body weighs less than one pound, and allow you to apply up to 5000 square feet of coating materials per day. It weighs less than a pound which helps to reduce fatigue.

By the middle of the afternoon, the sky had turned cloudy, and we did not want to risk the chance that the deck would get rained on before it was dry, so we called it a day. Next week (assuming we have good weather) we will finish coating the studio floor, and the ramp/deck areas, and we'll show you some before and after photos. 

 




Posted by on December 04, 2011


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The Armorpoxy Pallet arrive at epic via common carrier.

Each of these ArmorTex 5 gallon pails weigh 60 lbs.

The ADA ramp after one coat of ArmorTex with anti-skid texture.

We removed all the surface dirt and excess caulk from the plywood surfaces.

A power blower was used to remove the loose dirt.

We cut in all the areas around the poles and metal clips.

All seams were caulked (25 year acrylic latex) and hand painted.

Once all the small brush painting was done, we began applying ArmorTex with the 18 inch roller.

You can cover a large area with this roller quickly.

Here is what the deck looked like after the first coat of ArmorTex.

Close-up showing the anti-skid surface of the deck.

For the Armorpoxy II installation in the studio, we began by hand sweeping it.

Next, we power washed the concrete surface.

Some grease spots required a concentrated effort to remove.

Armoretch with safety gear.

Carefully adding the Armoretch to water.

Working the Armoretch acid into the pours of the concrete.

Power washing the Armoretch.

Power washing the rear of the studio.

 
 
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